Twitter Followup

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TWITTER FOLLOWUP….Via James Joyner, Michael Arrington writes on his blog that he thinks Twitter has ruined uber-twitterer Robert Scoble’s life:

I asked Robert how much time he actually spends on those services. He monitors them all day, he said, hitting refresh over and over on both (he doesn’t use desktop clients to manage the services, and he says he doesn’t like real-time streaming feature on Friendfeed). In addition to watching all day, he says he spends at least seven hours a day, seven days a week, actually reading and responding directly on those services.

That’s 2,555 hours over the last year….It is an addiction.

What is the cost of this addiction? Well, I’ll put his family life aside, that’s his business. But his blog has clearly suffered. He now posts only a few times a week, sometimes sporadically writing multiple posts in a day but often skipping 3-4 days in between. A year ago, Robert wrote multiple posts, every day. I used to read his blog daily, now I visit once a week.

As an aside, I’ll note how amusing it is that in the same way that people once complained that blogging crowded out “serious” long form work like books and magazine pieces, people are now starting to complain about Twitter crowding out “serious” blog posts. The worm, she does turn.

Anyway. I created a Twitter account a couple of days ago after I posted about it, since I figured that was the only way to get a better sense of what it was all about. So far, I’ve tweeted twice, so obviously I haven’t exactly embraced the form. But in a way, I think Arrington’s post captures one of the problems with Twitter: like Facebook, it doesn’t really make too much sense unless you spend a lot of time with it. It doesn’t have to be 2,555 hours a year, mind you, but both Facebook and Twitter strike me as things that are perhaps moderately useful if you use them occasionally, but potentially highly useful if you’re logged into them constantly and use them as primary tools for keeping in touch with people. That’s unlike the blogosphere, where most people pick three or four blogs to follow and read them once a day for 20 minutes or so, and it’s one of the things that makes these services hard to “get” unless you’re totally committed to them.

Of course, I could be full of hooey here. But that’s my take so far.

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Reclaiming power from those who abuse it often starts with telling the truth. And in "This Is How Authoritarians Get Defeated," MoJo's Monika Bauerlein unpacks six truths to remember during the homestretch of an election where democracy, truth, and decency are on the line.

Truth #1: The chaos is the point.

Truth #2: Team Reality is bigger than it seems.

Truth #3: Facebook owns this.

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Truth #5: It's about minority rule.

Truth #6: The only thing that can save us is…us.

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SIX TRUTHS

Reclaiming power from those who abuse it often starts with telling the truth. And in "This Is How Authoritarians Get Defeated," MoJo's Monika Bauerlein unpacks six truths to remember during the homestretch of an election where democracy, truth, and decency are on the line.

Truth #1: The chaos is the point.

Truth #2: Team Reality is bigger than it seems.

Truth #3: Facebook owns this.

Truth #4: When we go to work, we're in the fight.

Truth #5: It's about minority rule.

Truth #6: The only thing that can save us is…us.

Please take a moment to see how all these truths add up, because what happens in the weeks and months ahead will reverberate for at least a generation and we better be prepared.

And if you think journalism like Mother Jones'—that calls it like it is, that will never acquiesce to power, that looks where others don't—can help guide us through this historic, high-stakes moment, and you're able to right now, please help us reach our $350,000 goal by October 31 with a donation today. It's all hands on deck for democracy.

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