The Mystery of Fact Checking

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Megan McArdle comments on a book review that bemoans its target’s many basic factual errors:

This is what fact checkers are for, and I don’t understand why book publishers don’t have them. They cost money, to be sure–but not that much money….A quarter of a million dollars a year would get you the world’s finest staff of crack fact checkers.

….Presumably the answer is that it isn’t economic: readers don’t care, and indeed rarely learn; there’s no money in preventing the occasional catastrophe []. But then one must turn the question around: why do magazines like The Economist, the New Yorker, and yes, The Atlantic, employ fact checkers? Our readers are the potential consumers of books like the one that the Economist is reviewing; do they care less about accuracy in their books than in their magazine articles?

Not that anyone at The Atlantic thinks about it that way; we employ fact checkers because it seems like the right thing to do. But why does this ethic prevail at so many magazines, and at no publishing house?

I have my doubts about this. When I think about the amount of work that MoJo’s fact checkers put into the 4,000-word articles I write, and then multiply that by 20 for the entire magazine, that’s a lot of fact checking. And it’s probably less than you’d need for the average 300-page nonfiction book. At a guess (since no fact checkers are checking this blog), I’d say that fact checking a book would cost upwards of $5-10,000, and considering that most nonfiction books don’t even make back their advances, that’s a lot of money.

But there’s another thing going on here as well: if a book has errors, people blame the author. They don’t generally blame Random House or Simon & Schuster. But if there are errors in a magazine, people blame the magazine. So magazines simply have a stronger incentive to protect their brand than book publishers do.

Beyond that, I suppose it’s just inertia: magazines have had fact checkers for a long time and book publishers haven’t. Any other ideas?

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THE TRUTH IS...

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And the truth is, going into the final 4 days of the year we still needed to raise $TK to hit our $350,000 goal and start 2021 on track. It's nerve-wracking, wondering if the big spike we normally see at the end of December is going to be another thing that doesn't go as planned in 2020, or worse, if, now that Donald Trump is set to leave the White House (for longer than a taxpayer-funded golf trip to a property he owns), folks might be pulling back from fighting for the truth and a democracy and think the hard work is done.

It's not, and if you can right now, please consider a year-end donation to support our team's fearless nonprofit journalism so we can close that big fundraising gap and finish the year strong, ready for all that's ahead in 2021. Whether you can give $5 or $500, it all matters in keeping us charging hard, and we'd be grateful.

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