Why Are Republicans So Obsessed With the Whistleblower? Here’s Why.

Devin Nunes, California's most embarrassing member of Congress.Shawn Thew/CNP via ZUMA

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Marcy Wheeler comments on today’s impeachment hearings:


Republicans are desperate for the name of the whistleblower to become public. But why? All the allegations in the whistleblower’s complaint have long since been confirmed by testimony and firsthand reports, after all. It no longer matters what the whistleblower said.

Here’s the explanation: Republicans all know who the whistleblower is. What’s more, a couple of years ago they had a minor run-in with this person on an unrelated issue. Since then, they’ve compiled a 40-page dossier on the whistleblower and they’re practically bursting with impatience to unload it all over Fox News. As you can imagine, there’s nothing of real substance in this dossier, but they figure there’s enough smoke and smears to distract attention from Donald Trump’s crimes for a while.

But first the whistleblower’s name has to become public. None of the Republicans have the guts to just get up in the well of the House and say the name, and they’re endlessly frustrated that no one else of any stature has said it either—nor is any mainstream news outlet willing to say it. The name is basically common knowledge, but for now it remains public only in the undernews.

Anyway, that’s the story. That’s why Devin Nunes keeps saying “whistleblower whistleblower whistleblower.”

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