Three Crises and a President

Stefani Reynolds/CNP via ZUMA

Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.

The year 2020 in a nutshell:

Crisis #1: The United States is hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. Donald Trump insists it’s no big deal and fritters away months of time that could have been used to prepare for it. In April, having done almost nothing as cases and deaths continued rising, he begins demanding that lockdowns end—almost certainly far before they should have been. In May the number of COVID-19 deaths goes over 100,000.

Crisis #2: Congress ponders how to respond to the economic recession caused by the virus. Trump and his Republican enablers propose a bill that helps out businesses but ignores the devastation that unemployment has caused for individuals, hospitals, and schools. They agree to add provisions that help individuals only after Democrats force them to. In May, as the epidemic continues to get worse, Trump shrugs and resists any further help.

Crisis #3: In late May, protests and riots over the death of a Black man in the custody of a white police officer engulf the country. Trump stays silent because “some of his advisers calculated that he should not speak to the nation because he had nothing new to say and had no tangible policy or action to announce yet.” Instead he rage tweets about calling out the National Guard and blaming Democratic mayors for not being tough enough. Even many Republicans are appalled, admitting that Trump is doing nothing but making things worse.

This is how our president has responded to the three great crises of 2020. And we still have half the year to go.

FACT:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn't fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation today so we can keep on doing the type of journalism 2021 demands.

payment methods

FACT:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn't fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation today so we can keep on doing the type of journalism 2021 demands.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate