Music Review: Dirt Don’t Hurt

Britain’s Holly Golightly and the Brokeoffs spew weird roots music with woozy gusto.

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Since the early ’90s, Britain’s Holly Golightly has played garage rock with Thee Headcoatees, guested on the White Stripes’ Elephant, contributed music to Jim Jarmusch’s film Broken Flowers, and released more than a dozen albums of her own. Joined here by bassist Lawyer Dave, guitarist Golightly achieves low-fi nirvana, spewing weird roots music with a woozy gusto that implies overconsumption of dubious substances. On the jaunty “My .45,” they trade barbs in the tradition of great country duos; “Gettin’ High for Jesus” is stomping acoustic blues with a terrific Bo Diddley-style guitar riff.

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