Just Your Everyday $1 Million Bill Forgery Case

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one-million-dollar-bill.jpgThis made my day:

Man with $1M bill busted at bank

AIKEN, S.C. – A bank teller had a million reasons to deny this transaction.

Police say a man tried to open an account with a $1 million bill, which does not exist. The teller refused and called police while the man started to curse at bank workers, said Aiken County Sheriff’s spokesman Lt. Michael Frank.

Alexander D. Smith, 31, of Augusta, Ga., was charged with disorderly conduct and two counts of forgery, Frank said.

The second forgery charge came after investigators learned Smith bought several cartons of cigarettes from a nearby grocery store with a stolen check, Frank said.

If you had created a fake $1 million bill, who do you think would be most likely to notice the forgery? A bank, right? Wouldn’t it be smarter to head to 7/11 and try to purchase 600,000 slurpees?

Also, as the photo above shows (that’s the actually bill, by the way), the teller actually tried to use the forgery pen that determines if a bill is real or not. So a random dude walks in with a crumpled million dollar bill, and the teller actually tests to see if it’s real? That teller really believes in the good in people. I wish I had that much faith in humanity.

(H/T Wonkette)

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FACT:

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