McCain Hypocrisy on Obama’s Opt-Out Decision

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The McCain campaign has sharply criticized Barack Obama’s decision to become the first general election presidential candidate since the 1970s to opt out of the public financing system, a decision Obama can afford because of his stunning success with hundreds of thousands of low-dollar donors. As David notes at the link above, the McCain campaign said Obama’s decision “undermines his call for a new type of politics.”

But McCain, a longtime foe of Big Money in politics, once had a friendlier view of presidential fundraisers like Obama.

Here he is on the Fox News show “On the Record,” in January 2004:

“I think it’s wonderful that Howard Dean was able to use the Internet, $50, $75, $100 contributions. That’s what we want it to be all about. We want average citizens to contribute small amounts of money, and that’s a commitment to a campaign. So I’m for that. I think it’s a great thing. I think the Internet is going to change American politics for the better.”

And here he is on MSNBC’s “Hardball,” in June 2004:

“The Internet is generating more and more people involved in the political process with relatively small campaign contributions, $50, $75. That’s wonderful. No longer can an office holder call up a CEO or a trial lawyer or a union leader and say, I need $1 million. And, by the way, your legislation is up before my committee again.”

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And the truth is, going into the final 4 days of the year we still needed to raise $TK to hit our $350,000 goal and start 2021 on track. It's nerve-wracking, wondering if the big spike we normally see at the end of December is going to be another thing that doesn't go as planned in 2020, or worse, if, now that Donald Trump is set to leave the White House (for longer than a taxpayer-funded golf trip to a property he owns), folks might be pulling back from fighting for the truth and a democracy and think the hard work is done.

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