Palin’s Comments on Mining Measure Pushed the Limits of Executive Power

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In Alaska, it’s against the law for a governor to advocate for or against a ballot measure. But that didn’t matter much to Sarah Palin. At an August 20th press conference a reporter asked Palin her opinion of Measure 4, known as the Clean Water Initiative, which would have imposed new restrictions on mining companies. Fishermen worried that a proposal to build one of the world’s largest open-pit gold mines at the headwaters of one of the Alaska’s most productive salmon streams could wreck the famed Bristol Bay (which is also the namesake of Palin’s pregnant daughter). With the measure to restrict the mine coming down to a squeaker at the polls, this is what Palin said: “Let me take my governor’s hat off just for a minute here and tell you, personally, Prop 4 — I vote no on that.”

Her nod-and-wink endorsement was immediately seized by mining companies to create this ad, which ran in papers around the state as part of an $8 million media campaign–one of the most expensive ballot measure ad blitzes in Alaska history. Six days later, the Clean Water Initiative was voted down.

Clearly, Palin’s comments violated the spirit of Alaska’s law. And this wasn’t the only way she pushed legal boundaries to support her friends in the mining industry. Palin’s Department of Natural Resources had published a primer on Measure 4 on its website that environmentalists complained was entirely negative and improperly echoed the mining industry’s concerns. On August 24th, just three days before voters weighed in on the initiative, the state’s Public Offices Commission finally ruled that the enviros were right and ordered the website to undergo changes.

There are weird echoes of the Bush/Cheney war over executive power here.

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