Blackwater Contractors Indicted For Manslaughter, “Surrender” in Utah

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The Justice Department has unsealed a 35-count indictment (.pdf) against five Blackwater contractors charged with the manslaughter of 17 Iraqis in a Baghdad traffic circle in September 2007. Those indicted, all former US soldiers and Marines, include: Donald Ball from West Valley City, Utah; Dustin Heard from Knoxville, Tenn.; Evan Liberty from Rochester, N.H.; Nick Slatten from Sparta, Tenn.; and Paul Slough, from Keller, Texas. All face up to 30 years in prison under an obscure law dealing with the use of machine guns in violent crimes that federal prosecutors have adapted for the case. A sixth Blackwater guard also involved in the shooting incident, Jeremy Ridgeway, took a plea deal (.pdf) offered by the Justice Department.

The unsealed documents offer a gritty, blow-by-blow account of what happened as “Raven 23,” the Blackwater security convoy’s radio call sign that day, entered Nisour Square and opened fire—either in self defense, as Blackwater has claimed, or “upon a sudden quarrel and heat of passion,” as the indictment alleges.

The five Blackwater guards “surrendered” to authorities today in Salt Lake City, Utah, in hopes that a potential trial there would involve jurors more sympathetic to their case, reports NPR.

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