Really, First Read?

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Yesterday, I noted how strange it was that MSNBC’s First Read leavened their usual breathless coverage of polling and public opinion with the sentence, “But [Obama’s] presidency won’t be judged by what happened on this trip; rather, it will be judged on what happens afterward.” Ordinarily, First Read would read deep into polls and proclaim a “public image problem” or a “public image triumph” (or some such) for some political actor. But yesterday the writers seemed to acknowledge that basing one’s political journalism on day-to-day polling was silly; long-term events, they acknowledged, have far more to do with our leaders’ successes and failures. Had First Read learned an important lesson about the way journalists do our work?

Nope. Here’s the gang today:

[Republicans] have maintained (for the most part) a unified opposition to Obama and the Democratic agenda. All Republicans, save for three moderate GOP senators, voted against Obama’s stimulus. And every single Republican voted against the Democratic budget. But looking at recent polls, we’ve got to ask: Where has this gotten the GOP so far? The recent New York Times/CBS poll showed the Republican Party’s favorability rating at an all-time low, matching the result from last month’s NBC/WSJ poll.

Guys, come on. If Obama will be judged not based on what he does now but on the long-term results of very major decisions, as you said yesterday, doesn’t the same standard apply to the congressional opposition?

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TIME IS RUNNING OUT!

We have an ambitious $350,000 online fundraising goal this month and it's truly crunch time: About 15 percent of our yearly online giving usually comes in during the final week of the year, and in "No Cute Headlines or Manipulative BS," we explain why we simply can't afford to come up short right now.

The bottom line: Corporations and powerful people with deep pockets will never sustain the type of journalism Mother Jones exists to do. And advertising or profit-driven ownership groups will never make time-intensive, in-depth reporting viable.

That's why donations big and small make up 74 percent of our budget this year. There is no backup to keep us going, no alternate revenue source, no secret benefactor. If readers don’t donate, we won’t be here. It's that simple.

And if you can help us out with a donation right now, all online gifts will be matched thanks to an incredibly generous matching gift pledge.

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