Limbaugh Compares Obama To Shaft

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No one was expecting right-wing radio host Rush Limbaugh to support President Barack Obama’s jobs bill. But comparing Obama to blaxploitation film hero John Shaft? That’s a little random: 

 The picture accompanies the latest routine from longtime Limbaugh collaborator Paul Shanklin of “Barack The Magic Negro” fame.

For those of us who weren’t alive in the blaxploitation era, John Shaft is a daring private detective who sleeps with lots of women and protects Harlem from the encroachment of the exploitative white mob. So, basically the opposite of the married, conciliatory Ivy League family man in the White House. But for Limbaugh, who has spent the past few years reducing every single element of the Obama administration‘s agenda to an effort to take white people’s hard-earned money and redistribute it to non-whites, the comparison must be obvious. I’m not even sure this goes in the top ten most offensive Limbaugh comparisons. A few weeks ago he was comparing Obama to Zimbabwean Dictator Robert Mugabe.

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We just wrapped up a shorter-than-normal, urgent-as-ever fundraising drive and we came up about $45,000 short of our $300,000 goal.

That means we're going to have upwards of $350,000, maybe more, to raise in online donations between now and June 30, when our fiscal year ends and we have to get to break-even. And even though there's zero cushion to miss the mark, we won't be all that in your face about our fundraising again until June.

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