John McCain: Stand-Up Guy or Total Jerk?

“You know, I’ve been called a maverick; someone who marches to the beat of his own drum,” Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) boasted during his speech at the 2008 Republican convention. But for every instance of McCain bucking party orthodoxy or straddling the partisan divide, there’s one of him being an obstinate, angry jerk. (The current example of this being his attempt to turn the Benghazi controversy into a Watergate-sized scandal.) This duality recalls Goofus and Gallant, the twin brothers who have long entertained Highlights for Children readers with their contrasting antics:

Goofus McCain

Gallant McCain

Tells this joke: “Why is Chelsea Clinton so ugly? Because her father is Janet Reno.” Later befriends Sen. Hillary Clinton and calls her “one of the guys.”
Unapologetically calls his Vietnamese captors “gooks”—in 2000. Says that torture is “unworthy and injurious to our country.”
Freaks out over the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. Says the Swift Boat ads about John Kerry’s war record were “dishonest and dishonorable.”
Votes against more disclosure for dark-money donors. Bashes Citizens United as “one of the worst decisions” ever.
Praises “spectacular” running mate Sarah Palin’s “incredible résumé.” Criticizes the “agents of intolerance” in the Christian right.
Says he’d be okay with US troops staying in Iraq for “maybe 100 years.” Corrects a supporter who insists Obama is “an Arab.”
Goes from backing climate legislation to saying climate science may be “flawed.” Criticizes congressional tea partiers for their “bizarro” debt ceiling demands.
Says Susan Rice is “not qualified” to be the next secretary of state due to “not being very bright” and her comments about the Benghazi attacks. Defends Hillary Clinton adviser Huma Abedin from Rep. Michele Bachmann’s “specious and degrading attacks.”

 

TIME IS RUNNING OUT!

We have an ambitious $350,000 online fundraising goal this month and it's truly crunch time: About 15 percent of our yearly online giving usually comes in during the final week of the year, and in "No Cute Headlines or Manipulative BS," we explain why we simply can't afford to come up short right now.

The bottom line: Corporations and powerful people with deep pockets will never sustain the type of journalism Mother Jones exists to do. And advertising or profit-driven ownership groups will never make time-intensive, in-depth reporting viable.

That's why donations big and small make up 74 percent of our budget this year. There is no backup to keep us going, no alternate revenue source, no secret benefactor. If readers don’t donate, we won’t be here. It's that simple.

And if you can help us out with a donation right now, all online gifts will be matched thanks to an incredibly generous matching gift pledge.

payment methods

TIME IS RUNNING OUT!

We have an ambitious $350,000 online fundraising goal this month and it's truly crunch time: About 15 percent of our yearly online giving usually comes in during the final week of the year, and in "No Cute Headlines or Manipulative BS," we explain why we simply can't afford to come up short right now.

The bottom line: Corporations and powerful people with deep pockets will never sustain the type of journalism Mother Jones exists to do. And advertising or profit-driven ownership groups will never make time-intensive, in-depth reporting viable.

That's why donations big and small make up 74 percent of our budget this year. There is no backup to keep us going, no alternate revenue source, no secret benefactor. If readers don’t donate, we won’t be here. It's that simple.

And if you can help us out with a donation right now, all online gifts will be matched thanks to an incredibly generous matching gift pledge.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate