“House of Cards” Veteran Wants To Make a Reality TV Show Starring Capitol Hill Staffers


Oh, boy.

On Thursday, the Washington Examiner‘s Betsy Woodruff reported that a veteran of the Netflix political drama House of Cards is working to produce a reality TV show based in Washington, DC. The show would star local “up-and-comers,” including Capitol Hill staffers (“the best and brightest on the hill”) between the ages of 19 and 29.

A casting session is set to be held on April 26. One source told the Examiner that the first round of casting has already occurred. (It’s unclear how many Hill staffers would actually be up for this, since most Senate and House offices probably wouldn’t allow employees to take part in a potentially revealing reality series.)

Mother Jones obtained the casting call, which is dated April 14. Check it out:

House of Cards reality tv show casting call

Sharon “Rocky” Roggio, who’s apparently behind the project, was the assistant property master on this year’s season of House of Cards and worked on A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas and the Red Dawn remake. Jena Serbu served as a production designer on Amish Mafia and Breaking Amish: LA.

Other attempts at reality TV in Washington include MTV’s The Real World: D.C. and Bravo’s The Real Housewives of DC. In 2011, Doron Ofir Casting (the company behind such reality-TV hits as Jersey Shore) put out a casting call for “young hot politicos who care about America [and] follow the heated debates, rallies, protests and scandals!” Last month, the Washington Post reported that Leftfield Pictures, the Manhattan production company behind Bravo’s hit show, Blood, Sweat and Heels, is considering launching a DC version of the series. TV dramas and comedies set in Washington, DC, include Scandal, Veep, The Americans, and the attempted sitcom H Street.

FOLLOW THE MONEY

Corporations and billionaires don’t fund journalism like ours that exists to shake things up. Instead, support from readers allows Mother Jones to call it like it is without fear, favor, or false equivalence.

And right now, a longtime friend of Mother Jones has pledged an incredibly generous gift to inspire—and double—giving from online readers. That's huge! Because you can see that our fall fundraising drive is well behind the $325,000 we need to raise. So if you agree that in-depth, fiercely independent journalism matters right now, please support our work and help us raise the money it takes to keep Mother Jones charging hard. Your gift, and all online donations up to $94,000 total, will be matched and go twice as far—but only until the November 9 deadline.

$400,000 to go: Please help us pick up the pace!

payment methods

FOLLOW THE MONEY

Corporations and billionaires don’t fund journalism like ours that exists to shake things up. Instead, support from readers allows Mother Jones to call it like it is without fear, favor, or false equivalence.

And right now, a longtime friend of Mother Jones has pledged an incredibly generous gift to inspire—and double—giving from online readers. That's huge! Because you can see that our fall fundraising drive is well behind the $325,000 we need to raise. So if you agree that in-depth, fiercely independent journalism matters right now, please support our work and help us raise the money it takes to keep Mother Jones charging hard. Your gift, and all online donations up $94,000 total, will be matched and go twice as far—but only until the November 9 deadline.

$400,000 to go: Please help us pick up the pace!

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate