Can’t Vote in the Upcoming Midterms? We Want to Hear From You.

If you’re getting involved in other ways, tell us how.

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The midterm elections are just weeks away, and Americans across the country will get the opportunity to make their voices heard at the polls on November 6.

But at least 6.1 million people won’t be able to cast a vote due to felon disenfranchisement laws. Many states prohibit those convicted of a felony from voting, and in four states—Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, and Virginia—ex-felons are indefinitely barred from voting, even after serving their time. Communities of color are particularly affected: One out of every 13 black adults—and one in five in Florida—cannot vote due to these laws. Still, some states have recently eased or completely repealed lifetime felony disenfranchisement laws. And, as Mother Jones senior reporter Ari Berman writes, a ballot measure in Florida could restore the right to vote to as many as 1.4 million ex-felons this November. 

If you cannot vote in the upcoming midterms due to these laws, we’d like to hear from you. What do you think about the upcoming midterm elections? What are other ways you’re getting involved? You can fill out the form below, send us an email at talk@motherjones.com, or leave us a voicemail at (510) 519-MOJO. We may use some of your responses in a follow-up story.

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FACT:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn't fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation today so we can keep on doing the type of journalism 2020 demands.

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