Mayor Pete Buttigieg Chats About the Challenges of Growing Up Gay and Finally Finding Love

“I had no idea what it was like to be in love… I realized it was time to come out.”

Candidate Photos/Newscom/ZUMA Press

Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters.

Earlier today, we told you about presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg’s appearance in front of a sold-out crowd at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, Thursday night. He took the chance to share his plans to bring the rigor of running a small rust-belt town (South Bend, Indiana) to the White House. But there were many more moments from this wide-ranging hour-long chat with Mother Jones Editor-in-Chief Clara Jeffery that we think are worth highlighting. Here are five clips, including a candid back-and-forth about the challenges of coming out while in office, and what it really takes to beat Trump.

Growing up gay in Indiana

“You think there’s something wrong with you,” Buttigieg says of being in the closet in high school. The 37-year-old mayor stands out for being the first openly gay man to run for president from a major party—his husband is a fun Twitter follow. He spoke in personal detail about growing up gay in rural Indiana, hiding his sexuality while he served in the military, and finding love as an adult. Watch below:

“Mayor Pete”, as he’s known to his constituents, said that even though his electorate trended towards social conservatism, voters overwhelmingly supported his decision to come out. Stay for the kicker of this video:

Taking on Trump

Buttigieg (pron. Boot-edge-edge) relayed several big policy ideas throughout the talk, many of which he shares with other candidates in the crowded field. But Buttigieg said the strength of his ideas, as well as his commitment to addressing why voters went with Trump in the first place, would make him stand out. “A message is something that makes sense no matter who’re you’re running against.”

Day One in the Oval Office

Buttigieg said his top priority would be democratic reform. “Every other issue we face, every policy issue—of which I believe the most urgent is climate—every one of those will not get solved properly as long as our democracy is this twisted,” he said.

Advice to voters

Not without a sense of humor, the Millennial Mayor had some advice for democratic voters at large: “What you want to do is nominate a really forward-thinking…”

For a full, in-depth look at the event, and even more about Mayor Pete, you can check out our longer recap here.

TIME IS RUNNING OUT!

We have an ambitious $350,000 online fundraising goal this month and it's truly crunch time: About 15 percent of our yearly online giving usually comes in during the final week of the year, and in "No Cute Headlines or Manipulative BS," we explain why we simply can't afford to come up short right now.

The bottom line: Corporations and powerful people with deep pockets will never sustain the type of journalism Mother Jones exists to do. And advertising or profit-driven ownership groups will never make time-intensive, in-depth reporting viable.

That's why donations big and small make up 74 percent of our budget this year. There is no backup to keep us going, no alternate revenue source, no secret benefactor. If readers don’t donate, we won’t be here. It's that simple.

And if you can help us out with a donation right now, all online gifts will be matched thanks to an incredibly generous matching gift pledge.

payment methods

TIME IS RUNNING OUT!

We have an ambitious $350,000 online fundraising goal this month and it's truly crunch time: About 15 percent of our yearly online giving usually comes in during the final week of the year, and in "No Cute Headlines or Manipulative BS," we explain why we simply can't afford to come up short right now.

The bottom line: Corporations and powerful people with deep pockets will never sustain the type of journalism Mother Jones exists to do. And advertising or profit-driven ownership groups will never make time-intensive, in-depth reporting viable.

That's why donations big and small make up 74 percent of our budget this year. There is no backup to keep us going, no alternate revenue source, no secret benefactor. If readers don’t donate, we won’t be here. It's that simple.

And if you can help us out with a donation right now, all online gifts will be matched thanks to an incredibly generous matching gift pledge.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate