Donald Trump’s Top Financial Lieutenant Surrenders to Manhattan DA

Allen Weisselberg and the Trump Organization are expected to face charges for tax crimes.

Allen Weisselberg, chief financial officer of the Trump Organization, stands behind the Trump at a 2017 press conference in Trump Tower.Evan Vucci/AP

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Allen Weisselberg, the chief financial officer of Donald Trump’s company, surrendered early this morning to the office of Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance. A federal grand jury yesterday returned indictments against Weisselberg and the Trump Organization in connection with Vance’s long-running investigation into alleged tax fraud by the company and its executives.

The precise charges against Weisselberg and the company are not yet clear. The indictments are expected to be unsealed this afternoon. But it has been widely reported that Vance—as he ratcheted up pressure on Weisselberg to cooperate in his probe—has zeroed in on tax crimes related to lucrative fringe benefits provided by Trump’s company to Weisselberg.

“Allen Weisselberg is a loving and devoted husband, father and grandfather who has worked at the Trump Organization for 48 years,” a Trump Organization spokesperson said in a statement, blasting the charges. “He is now being used by the Manhattan District Attorney as a pawn in a scorched earth attempt to harm the former President. The District Attorney is bringing a criminal prosecution involving employee benefits that neither the IRS nor any other District Attorney would ever think of bringing. This is not justice; this is politics.” 

This is a developing story. 

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