A Jazz Solidarity Concert With Danny Glover, Bruce Willis, Wayne Shorter, and Dozens More

The coronavirus is a rapidly developing news story, so some of the content in this article might be out of date. Check out our most recent coverage of the coronavirus crisis, and subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.

Club closures and festival shutdowns mean financial freefall for the many underpaid musicians living gig to gig, but the Jazz Foundation of America is taking creative, heroic action: an emergency fund and massive concert this Thursday with a big-name lineup in and beyond jazz—Wayne Shorter, Elvis Costello, Sheryl Crow, Danny Glover, Bruce Willis (blues harmonica; give him a chance), Rosie Perez, Jon Batiste, and many others, hosted by Keegan-Michael Key. Yes, a number of nonjazz celebs powering the party, but the full lineup is here, and the solidarity and support across genres keep the funds flowing and resilience up.

This isn’t jazz’s first emergency. It was born in one. From the field hollers and work songs to Billie Holiday’s “Strange Fruit,” Archie Shepp’s Fire Music, Nina Simone’s “Mississippi Goddam,” and the Jazz and People’s Movement led by Rahsaan Roland Kirk and Lee Morgan, jazz is a sound of stamina. Of swing, survival, overcoming obstacles, resistance, celebration, and more. However you hear the full range of jazz, catch it Thursday and let me know what you think of the concert, and how online festivals can defy social distancing, at recharge@motherjones.com. (And bookmark our new Recharge blog for surprises this week.)

FACT:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn't fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation today so we can keep on doing the type of journalism 2020 demands.

payment methods

FACT:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn't fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation today so we can keep on doing the type of journalism 2020 demands.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate